"Arduus Interfaces" Jeff Tallon

May 2, 2013 - May 15, 2013

Welcome to this issue of ENGINE GALLERY Update. Please join us for the launch of a new exhibition titled 'Arduous Interfaces', featuring a collection of recent works by artist Jeff Tallon. Jeff Tallon is a Canadian contemporary artist known for developing a unique convergence between mobile technology and traditional oil painting. Integrating audio, video and text messaging with contemporary artwork. He publicly displayed Canada's first QR Code painting at the 2010 Toronto International Art Fair.

Jeff Tallon - Arduous Interfaces
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May 4 - May 12, 2013
Opening Reception: Saturday May 4, 2013
6 PM – 9 PM

Jeff Tallon

In the early 2000's, after receiving a BFA in Drawing from ACAD, Jeff Tallon lived throughout Canada, Europe and Asia. These experiences inform the global yet local nature of his work and question nationalism, truth, identity, commerce, consumerism and communication.

Since 2009, Tallon has been synthesizing painting and technology. Some of his paintings include QR Codes, which allow viewers to capture content using a hand-held device.

Tallon's initial interactive paintings sent text messages to participants creating a sense of faux-intimacy. Subsequently, the breadth of his work has grown to unite photography, oil paint, text, audio/video and the Internet.

He'll be in the upcoming publication of Volume VI of INTERNATIONAL CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS' scheduled for release in May 2013.

"This latest body of work deals with interactive painting, which allows viewers to communicate with a work using virtually any smartphone.

Like an early Lichtenstein that provides narration, these works communicate textual material. By using QR Codes that encapsulate a message, viewers can take a photo of the work with their mobile phones and receive a text message or a link to the Internet.

This transcends the passive viewership that has been associated with painting for millennia and allows viewers to engage with works in a way that has never been done before. It is a reflection of the times in which we live and allows viewers to question the means and methods they take to communicate with each other.

Texting, for instance, is a method of communication that has swept the globe and has embedded itself in youth culture in particular. In 2010, the Nielsen Company and the Pew Research Center released a study that showed the average U.S. teen sends or receives an average of 2,899 text-messages per month, which is almost 96 texts per day.

A text is typically a personal experience, a piece of information received from someone you have granted permission to contact you. I wish to recreate the intimate and personal, yet everyday, experience of a text and transform it. By having an inanimate object send a seemingly personal message to the viewer, I?ve sought to create a type of faux-intimacy.

It allows people to communicate with a foreign object, but the action lends itself to familiarity at the same time. This disparate action challenges viewers to relive routine in a new and unfamiliar way. The interactivity of the work asks us to question routine and ultimately ourselves; it not only calls into question who we are, but the actions we take that shape society." –Jeff Tallon

  • Apple
  • Aromes Du Terroir
  • Courtesy of Jack Layton
  • Falls
  • I want you to know
  • Instant Classic
  • Media Darling
  • Upper Canada
  • One Quarter Caribou
  • The Death of General Wolf Revisited
  • The Falls
  • The Ugly Truth
  • Triad